Jul 24, 2014
5,831 notes

What Lot's Wife Would Have Said (If She Wasn't A Pillar of Salt)

eating-poetry:

Do you remember when we met
in Gomorrah? When you were still beardless,
and I would oil my hair in the lamp light before seeing
you, when we were young, and blushed with youth
like bruised fruit. Did we care then
what our neighbors did
in the dark?

When our first…

Jul 24, 2014
959 notes
They give you little bullshit amounts of money in exchange for your working – wages and so forth – and then they steal all that shit back from you in terms of the way they got this other thing set up – his whole credit gimmick society man, consumer credit, buy shit buy shit on credit, he give you a little bit of shit to cool your ass out and then steal all that shit back with shit called interest – the price of money. Motherfuckers in non-producing, non-existent industries ya know motherfuckers who deal with paper. There’s a cat who would stand up and say to you he’s “in mining”, and he sits in an office man on the hundred and ninety ninth floor in some motherfucking building on Wall Street, and he’s “in mining” and he has paper, certificates, which are embroidered and shit you know, stocks, bonds, debentures, obligations, you know, “he’s in mining”, and he’s sitting up in Wall Street and his fingernails ain’t been dirty in his motherfucking life; he went to Phillips Andover or Exeter, he went to Harvard, he went to Yale, he went to the Wharton School of Business, and “he’s in mining”?

The motherfuckers who deal with intangibles are the motherfuckers who are rewarded in this society. The more abstract and intangible your shit is, come on stocks? What is stock? Stock certificates is evidence of ownership in something that’s real. Ownership. He owns and controls and therefore receives you know the benefit from, that’s what they call profit. He’s fucking with shit in Bolivia, he’s fucking with shit in Chile, he’s Anaconda, he’s United Fruit, he’s “in mining”, he’s in what? He ain’t never in his life produced shit. Investment bankers, stock brokers, insurance man, it’s motherfuckers who don’t do nothing. We see that this whole society man exists and rests upon workers and that this whole motherfucking society controlled by this ruling clique is parasitic, vulturistic, cannibalistic and is sucking and destroying man the lives of motherfucking workers and we have to stop it because it’s evil.
Ken Cockerel, a communist activist with the League of Revolutionary Black Workers explains capitalism [video of the speech can be found here]  (via concretesorrow)

(Source: nov---18th, via afghangry)

Jul 24, 2014
89,702 notes

bedpartymakeover:

25 year old Chen Yen-hui recreates makeup looks from the Tang dynasty

People gotta signal boost the fuck out of this because you know it won’t get the attention it deserves till a white person copies it

(Source: 70s-postmiserablisms, via musicisthespiceoflife)

Jul 24, 2014
4,324 notes

thinksquad:

Newly obtained surveillance video shows the violent encounter between a 17-year-old girl and Clairton police officers that left the teenager in the hospital.

A 17-year-old girl claims she was beaten by police in Clairton after she and her friends were stopped for a curfew violation Tuesday night.

Merceedez Wright admits she and her friends were out a few minutes after the city’s 10 p.m. curfew, and that she both ran from officers and resisted them after being tackled, but she doesn’t believe she deserves the injuries she suffered.

Wright is now recovering in the hospital with injuries to her trachea, esophagus and neck, plus several cuts and bruises.

"She’s a cheerleader, she’s a lifeguard at the Clairton pool, she was just on prom court," said Wright’s mother, Audelia Amoah. "She’s a good kid."

Even so, Wright admits she ran from officers.

"I was scared because of how he got out of the car. He didn’t just walk out, he jumped out of the car and started chasing me, so my first instinct was to run," she said.

Wright also said she did resist officers once she was knocked to the ground. She said she was trying to get her arms free to protect herself.

Clairton police did not respond to requests for comment.

Read more: http://www.wtae.com/news/teenage-girl-says-police-beat-her-after-curfew-violation/26992088#ixzz388DHjtCm

(via reverseracism)

Jul 24, 2014
116 notes
In the mid-twentieth century, Mailer attributed European American fascination with and attraction to Black culture to the marginalized, rebellious nature of African American life, an existence in which African Americans go against the American grain and dare to live life on their own terms. Writing toward the end of that century, in a provocative 1997 essay entitled, “Are Black People Cooler Than White People?,” writer Donnell Alexander contends that it’s the tryna-make-a-dollar-outa-fifteen-cent outlook that accounts for crossover. “Cool, the basic reason Blacks remain in the American cultural mix is an industry of style that everyone in the world can use. It’s making something out of nothing. It’s the nigga metaphor. And nigga metaphor is the genius of America.” Notwithstanding the creative genius of Black Style, it is a culture of struggle that gave birth to the “nigga metaphor.” Whites get it at bargain-basement prices, don’t have to pay no dues, but they reap the psychological, social - and economic - benefits of a culture forged in enslavement, neo-enslavement, Jim Crow, U.S. apartheid, and continuing hard times.
Geneva Smitherman, Word From the Mother (via ganjagremlins)

(via blackfeminism)

Jul 24, 2014
40,547 notes
titspirationall:

lynnpls:


Where’d the name Iggy Azalea come from?
Iggy is the name of my old dog. I had a name plate necklace that I used to wear which read “Iggy.” People I’d meet assumed it was my name and started calling me that. Azalea is the street I grew up on – I’m from Azalea Street. My family still lives there to this day. (x)


#LITERAL#SALTINE#CRACKER


AM CRYING






SO FANCY.

titspirationall:

lynnpls:

Where’d the name Iggy Azalea come from?

Iggy is the name of my old dog. I had a name plate necklace that I used to wear which read “Iggy.” People I’d meet assumed it was my name and started calling me that. Azalea is the street I grew up on – I’m from Azalea Street. My family still lives there to this day. (x)

SO FANCY.

(Source: faineemae, via reverseracism)

Jul 24, 2014
5,155 notes
humansofnewyork:

"I told the truth on my job application about my past drug use, and they sent me a letter saying I didn’t meet their standards of integrity."

humansofnewyork:

"I told the truth on my job application about my past drug use, and they sent me a letter saying I didn’t meet their standards of integrity."

Jul 24, 2014
563 notes
america-wakiewakie:

(Via ThePeoplesRecord)

america-wakiewakie:

(Via ThePeoplesRecord)

Jul 24, 2014
395 notes

Questlove Makes a Case For Iggy Azalea, Calls "Fancy" the Song of the Summer

themelancholyblackwoman:

deepcotton57821:

bitteroreo:

crankyskirt:

sauicerspice:

afro-dominicano:

dynastylnoire:

darkmoonperfume:

Weigh in on what Questlove said

NO

Not Questlove :/

lmao this is the nigga who wrote a long-ass piece on how fucking hard it is to live as a “visble” Black man (and a tall, big one at that) and this nigga can’t really understand why Black woman wouldn’t be fucking w/ ol girl? Why do all the conscious niggas suddenly chill when it mostly Black women talking about a problem?

I enjoy the Roots’ back catalog, as well as Quest’s afro, but I feel like he’s the current poster boy for “dark-skinneded industry dude who still has a complex about Black girls not checking for him in high school” (see: Uncle Ruckus’ play-nephew A$AP Rocky).

This is the shit we talking bout’. When Black Women need Black Men’s support, on issues that will impact us, we get this shit. It’s always, “We need to open up our hearts.” it’s always “We need to share” whenever it’s about some damaging oppression that erases Black Women, we always have to “move over and make room.” And if we don’t do it nicely, and peacefully “We’re bitter black bitches, who hate anre are envious of non black women.” So we can talk about Macklemore and how Kendrick was robbed, how Black Men are overlooked in being rewarded for their music, and Black Women have jumped in supporting and defending, when we ask for support, for understanding, for acknowledgement of the harmful affects Iggy, Miley, Kreyshawn, are having on Black Women…..we get we need to chill. Now when’s it about Black Female Culture, it can no longer be appropriated, or gentrified, it can’t be stolen, it’s contagious like a damn disease and Black Women need to turn the other cheek, that’s some bullshit. Black Power is for Black Men.

Black Power is for Black Men.

I knew something was up when he started coming on Jimmy Fallon.

Jul 24, 2014
120 notes
america-wakiewakie:

No ceasefire without justice for Gaza | Electronic Intifada 
As academics, public figures and activists witnessing the intended genocide of 1.8 million Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip, we call for a ceasefire with Israel only if conditioned on an end to the blockade and the restoration of basic freedoms that have been denied to the people for more than seven years.
Our foremost concerns are not only the health and safety of the people in our communities, but also the quality of their lives – their ability to live free of fear of imprisonment without due process, to support their families through gainful employment, and to travel to visit their relatives and further their education.
These are fundamental human aspirations that have been severely limited for the Palestinian people for more than 47 years, but that have been particularly deprived from residents of Gaza since 2007. We have been pushed beyond the limits of what a normal person can be expected to endure.
A Living Death
Charges in the media and by politicians of various stripes that accuse Hamas of ordering Gaza residents to resist evacuation orders, and thus use them as human shields, are untrue. With temporary shelters full and the indiscriminate Israeli shelling, there is literally no place that is safe in Gaza.
Likewise, Hamas represented the sentiment of the vast majority of residents when it rejected the unilateral ceasefire proposed by Egypt and Israel without consulting anyone in Gaza. We share the broadly held public sentiment that it is unacceptable to merely return to the status quo – in which Israel strictly limits travel in and out of the Gaza Strip, controls the supplies that come in (including a ban on most construction materials), and prohibits virtually all exports, thus crippling the economy and triggering one of the highest poverty and unemployment rates in the Arab world.
To do so would mean a return to a living death.
Unfortunately, past experience has shown that the Israeli government repeatedly reneges on promises for further negotiations, as well as on its commitments to reform.
Likewise, the international community has demonstrated no political will to enforce these pledges. Therefore, we call for a ceasefire only when negotiated conditions result in the following:
Freedom of movement of Palestinians in and out of the Gaza Strip.
Unlimited import and export of supplies and goods, including by land, sea and air.
Unrestricted use of the Gaza seaport.
Monitoring and enforcement of these agreements by a body appointed by the United Nations, with appropriate security measures.
Each of these expectations is taken for granted by most countries, and it is time for the Palestinians of Gaza to be accorded the human rights they deserve.
Signatures:
Akram Habeeb, Assistant Professor of American Literature, Islamic University of Gaza (IUG)
Mona El-Farra, Vice President and Health Chair of the Palestinian Red Crescent Society
Ramy Abdu PhD, Chairman of the Euro-mid Observer
Abdullah Alsaafin, Palestinian Writer/journalist
Ali Alnazli, Businessman
Adel Awadallah, Head of the Scientific Research Council
Hanine Hassan, Graduate Research Assistant
Sheren Awad, Journalist
Yahia Al-Sarraj, Associate Professor of Transportation, IUG
Tawfik Abu Shomar, Writer and political analyst
Hasan Owda, Businessman
Ibrahim AlYazji, Businessman
Walid Al Husari, Chair, Gaza Chamber of Commerce
Nael Almasri, Dentist
Wael El-Mabhouh, Political researcher
Rami Jundi, Political researcher
Ashraf Mashharawi, Filmmaker
Mohammad Alsawaf, Journalist
Hasan Abdo, Writer and political analyst
Kamal El Shaer, Political researcher
Omar Ferwana, Dean of Medicine Faculty, IUG
Iyad I. Al-Qarra, Journalist, Palestine newspaper
Musheir El-Farra, Palestinian activist and author
Khalil Namrouti, Associate Professor in Economics, IUG
Moein Rajab, Professor in Economics, Al-Azhar University - Gaza
Basil Nasser, Planning advisor
Hani Albasoos, Associate Professor in Political Science, IUG
Arafat Hilles, Assistant Professor, Al-Quds Open University
Imad Falouji, Head of Adam Center for Dialogue of Civilizations
Moin Naim, Writer and political analyst
Yousri Alghoul, Author
Mohammad Jayyab, Editor of Gaza Journal of Economics
Mousa Lubbad, Lecturer in Finance, Al-Aqsa University
Iskandar Nashwan, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Al-Aqsa University
Shadi AlBarqouni, Graduate Research Assistant
Adnan Abu Amer, Head of Political Department, Al-Umma University
Wael Al Sarraj, Assistant Professor in Computer Science, IUG
Said Namrouti, Lecturer in Human Resource Management, IUG
Khaled Al-Hallaq, Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering, IUG
Asad Asad, Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs, IUG
Hazem Alhusari, Lecturer in Finance, Al-Aqsa University
Shadi AlBarqouni, Graduate Research Assistant
Deya’a Kahlout, Journalist, Al-Araby newspaper
Raed Salha, Assistant Professor in Geography, IUG
Sameeh Alhadad, Businessman
Tarek M. Eslim, CEO, Altariq Systems and Projects
Sami Almalfouh PhD, Senior engineer
Fayed Abushammalah, Journalist
Fadel Naeim, Chairman of Palestine Physicians Syndicate
Zeyad Al-Sahhar, Associate Professor in Physics , Al-Aqsa University
Iyad Abu Hjayer, Director, Palestinian Center for Democracy and Conflict Resolution
Wael Al-Daya, Associate Professor in Finance, IUG
Younis Eljarou, Head of the Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
Donia ElAmal Ismail, Head of the Creative Women Association
Zeinab Alghonemi, Head of Women for Legal Consulting Association
Amjad AlShawa, Palestinian Nongovernmental Organizations Network (PNGO)
Mohsen Abo Ramadan, Head of Palestinian Nongovernmental Organziations Network (PNGO)
Abed Alhameed Mortaja, Assistant Professor of Linguistics, IUG
Talal Abo Shawesh , Head of Afaq Jadeeda Association
Zohair Barzaq, Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
Marwan Alsabh, Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
Ghassan Matar, Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
Rania Lozon, Writer
Ashraf Saqer, IT Specialist
Samir AlMishal, Mishal Cultural Centre
Jamila Sarhan, Independant Commission for Human Rights
Jalal Arafat, Union of Agricultrual Work Committees
Khalil Abu Shammala, Aldameer Association for Human Rights
Jamila Dalloul, Association Head of Jothor ElZaiton
Maha Abo Zour, Psychologist
Psychologist Ferdous Alkatari
Yousef Awadallah, Health Work Committee
Yousef Alswaiti, Al-Awda Hospital Director
Taysir Alsoltan, Head of Health Work Committees
Taghreed Jomaa, Union of Palestinian Women’s Committees
Imad Ifranji, Journalist, Alquds TV
Jehal Alaklouk, Activist
Adel Alborbar, Boycott Committee
Hatem AbuShaban, Board of Trustees of Al-Azhar University - Gaza
Saleh Zaqout, Secretary of the Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
Mohammed Alsaqqa, Lawyer
Nihad Alsheikh Khalil, Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, IUG
Mohsen Alafranji, Lecturer at Media Department, IUG
Nedal Farid, Dean of Business Faculty, Al-Aqsa University
Salem Helles, Dean of Commerce Faculty, IUG
Ahmad Ali PhD, Economic Analysis
Raed M. Zourob PhD, Head of the Department of Preventive Medicine, Ministry of Health
Mosheer Amer, Professor of Lingusitics, IUG
Moheeb Abu Alqumboz, Lecturer
Fatma Mukhalalati, Supreme Court judge
Fahmi Alnajjar, Supreme Court judge
(Photo Credit: Ashraf Amra /APA images)

america-wakiewakie:

No ceasefire without justice for Gaza | Electronic Intifada 

As academics, public figures and activists witnessing the intended genocide of 1.8 million Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip, we call for a ceasefire with Israel only if conditioned on an end to the blockade and the restoration of basic freedoms that have been denied to the people for more than seven years.

Our foremost concerns are not only the health and safety of the people in our communities, but also the quality of their lives – their ability to live free of fear of imprisonment without due process, to support their families through gainful employment, and to travel to visit their relatives and further their education.

These are fundamental human aspirations that have been severely limited for the Palestinian people for more than 47 years, but that have been particularly deprived from residents of Gaza since 2007. We have been pushed beyond the limits of what a normal person can be expected to endure.

A Living Death

Charges in the media and by politicians of various stripes that accuse Hamas of ordering Gaza residents to resist evacuation orders, and thus use them as human shields, are untrue. With temporary shelters full and the indiscriminate Israeli shelling, there is literally no place that is safe in Gaza.

Likewise, Hamas represented the sentiment of the vast majority of residents when it rejected the unilateral ceasefire proposed by Egypt and Israel without consulting anyone in Gaza. We share the broadly held public sentiment that it is unacceptable to merely return to the status quo – in which Israel strictly limits travel in and out of the Gaza Strip, controls the supplies that come in (including a ban on most construction materials), and prohibits virtually all exports, thus crippling the economy and triggering one of the highest poverty and unemployment rates in the Arab world.

To do so would mean a return to a living death.

Unfortunately, past experience has shown that the Israeli government repeatedly reneges on promises for further negotiations, as well as on its commitments to reform.

Likewise, the international community has demonstrated no political will to enforce these pledges. Therefore, we call for a ceasefire only when negotiated conditions result in the following:

  • Freedom of movement of Palestinians in and out of the Gaza Strip.
  • Unlimited import and export of supplies and goods, including by land, sea and air.
  • Unrestricted use of the Gaza seaport.
  • Monitoring and enforcement of these agreements by a body appointed by the United Nations, with appropriate security measures.

Each of these expectations is taken for granted by most countries, and it is time for the Palestinians of Gaza to be accorded the human rights they deserve.

Signatures:

  • Akram Habeeb, Assistant Professor of American Literature, Islamic University of Gaza (IUG)
  • Mona El-Farra, Vice President and Health Chair of the Palestinian Red Crescent Society
  • Ramy Abdu PhD, Chairman of the Euro-mid Observer
  • Abdullah Alsaafin, Palestinian Writer/journalist
  • Ali Alnazli, Businessman
  • Adel Awadallah, Head of the Scientific Research Council
  • Hanine Hassan, Graduate Research Assistant
  • Sheren Awad, Journalist
  • Yahia Al-Sarraj, Associate Professor of Transportation, IUG
  • Tawfik Abu Shomar, Writer and political analyst
  • Hasan Owda, Businessman
  • Ibrahim AlYazji, Businessman
  • Walid Al Husari, Chair, Gaza Chamber of Commerce
  • Nael Almasri, Dentist
  • Wael El-Mabhouh, Political researcher
  • Rami Jundi, Political researcher
  • Ashraf Mashharawi, Filmmaker
  • Mohammad Alsawaf, Journalist
  • Hasan Abdo, Writer and political analyst
  • Kamal El Shaer, Political researcher
  • Omar Ferwana, Dean of Medicine Faculty, IUG
  • Iyad I. Al-Qarra, Journalist, Palestine newspaper
  • Musheir El-Farra, Palestinian activist and author
  • Khalil Namrouti, Associate Professor in Economics, IUG
  • Moein Rajab, Professor in Economics, Al-Azhar University - Gaza
  • Basil Nasser, Planning advisor
  • Hani Albasoos, Associate Professor in Political Science, IUG
  • Arafat Hilles, Assistant Professor, Al-Quds Open University
  • Imad Falouji, Head of Adam Center for Dialogue of Civilizations
  • Moin Naim, Writer and political analyst
  • Yousri Alghoul, Author
  • Mohammad Jayyab, Editor of Gaza Journal of Economics
  • Mousa Lubbad, Lecturer in Finance, Al-Aqsa University
  • Iskandar Nashwan, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Al-Aqsa University
  • Shadi AlBarqouni, Graduate Research Assistant
  • Adnan Abu Amer, Head of Political Department, Al-Umma University
  • Wael Al Sarraj, Assistant Professor in Computer Science, IUG
  • Said Namrouti, Lecturer in Human Resource Management, IUG
  • Khaled Al-Hallaq, Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering, IUG
  • Asad Asad, Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs, IUG
  • Hazem Alhusari, Lecturer in Finance, Al-Aqsa University
  • Shadi AlBarqouni, Graduate Research Assistant
  • Deya’a Kahlout, Journalist, Al-Araby newspaper
  • Raed Salha, Assistant Professor in Geography, IUG
  • Sameeh Alhadad, Businessman
  • Tarek M. Eslim, CEO, Altariq Systems and Projects
  • Sami Almalfouh PhD, Senior engineer
  • Fayed Abushammalah, Journalist
  • Fadel Naeim, Chairman of Palestine Physicians Syndicate
  • Zeyad Al-Sahhar, Associate Professor in Physics , Al-Aqsa University
  • Iyad Abu Hjayer, Director, Palestinian Center for Democracy and Conflict Resolution
  • Wael Al-Daya, Associate Professor in Finance, IUG
  • Younis Eljarou, Head of the Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
  • Donia ElAmal Ismail, Head of the Creative Women Association
  • Zeinab Alghonemi, Head of Women for Legal Consulting Association
  • Amjad AlShawa, Palestinian Nongovernmental Organizations Network (PNGO)
  • Mohsen Abo Ramadan, Head of Palestinian Nongovernmental Organziations Network (PNGO)
  • Abed Alhameed Mortaja, Assistant Professor of Linguistics, IUG
  • Talal Abo Shawesh , Head of Afaq Jadeeda Association
  • Zohair Barzaq, Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
  • Marwan Alsabh, Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
  • Ghassan Matar, Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
  • Rania Lozon, Writer
  • Ashraf Saqer, IT Specialist
  • Samir AlMishal, Mishal Cultural Centre
  • Jamila Sarhan, Independant Commission for Human Rights
  • Jalal Arafat, Union of Agricultrual Work Committees
  • Khalil Abu Shammala, Aldameer Association for Human Rights
  • Jamila Dalloul, Association Head of Jothor ElZaiton
  • Maha Abo Zour, Psychologist
  • Psychologist Ferdous Alkatari
  • Yousef Awadallah, Health Work Committee
  • Yousef Alswaiti, Al-Awda Hospital Director
  • Taysir Alsoltan, Head of Health Work Committees
  • Taghreed Jomaa, Union of Palestinian Women’s Committees
  • Imad Ifranji, Journalist, Alquds TV
  • Jehal Alaklouk, Activist
  • Adel Alborbar, Boycott Committee
  • Hatem AbuShaban, Board of Trustees of Al-Azhar University - Gaza
  • Saleh Zaqout, Secretary of the Red Crescent Society for the Gaza Strip
  • Mohammed Alsaqqa, Lawyer
  • Nihad Alsheikh Khalil, Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, IUG
  • Mohsen Alafranji, Lecturer at Media Department, IUG
  • Nedal Farid, Dean of Business Faculty, Al-Aqsa University
  • Salem Helles, Dean of Commerce Faculty, IUG
  • Ahmad Ali PhD, Economic Analysis
  • Raed M. Zourob PhD, Head of the Department of Preventive Medicine, Ministry of Health
  • Mosheer Amer, Professor of Lingusitics, IUG
  • Moheeb Abu Alqumboz, Lecturer
  • Fatma Mukhalalati, Supreme Court judge
  • Fahmi Alnajjar, Supreme Court judge

(Photo Credit: Ashraf Amra /APA images)

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I'm Dom Hill. Dom isn't my full name but it's what people call me and it's close enough. I prefer Mr. Hill. I'd love a monocle. Subscribe via RSS.